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The floure and the leafe

Bibliographie

Auteur:Attribué à tort à Geoffrey Chaucer
Titre:The floure and the leafe; The flower and the leaf
Date:Vers 1460-1480
Langue:Anglais
Genre: 
Forme:85 septains de vers rimant ababcdd (595 vers)
Contenu: 
Incipit:When that Phebus his chaire of gold so hie
had whirled up the sterry sky aloft,
and in the Boole was entred certainly;
when shoures sweet of raine discended soft…
Explicit:… how darst thou put thy self in prees for drede?
It is wonder that thou wexest not rede,
sith that thou wost ful lite who shall behold
thy rude language, full boistously unfold.
Explicit.
Manuscrits
  1. Longleat, Collection des Marquis de Bath, 258
    Le texte est mentionné dans la table des matières, mais les feuillets qui contenaient le texte ont aujourd'hui disparu.
Éditions anciennes
  1. Thomas Speght, 1598
Éditions modernes
  • The Knight's Tale, and, The Flower and the Leaf: after Geoffrey Chaucer: by Edward Hovel Thurlow, Lord Thurlow. Second edition, London, Booth, 1822, 158 p. [GB] [HT] [IA: ex. 1, ex. 2]
  • The Floure and the Leafe, and The Boke of Cupide, God of Love, or, The Cuckow and the Nightingale, edited by F. S. Ellis, Hammersmith, Kelmscott Press, 1896, 47 p. [IA]
  • Chaucerian and Other Pieces, edited from numerous manuscripts by the Rev. Walter W. Skeat, being a supplement to the Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1897, lxxxiv + 628 p. (ici p. 361-379) [GB] [IA]
  • The Floure and the Leafe, and The Assembly of Ladies, edited by Derek Pearsall, London, Nelson, 1962.
  • The Floure and the Leafe, The Assembly of Ladies, The Isle of Ladies, edited by Derek Pearsall, Kalamazoo, Medieval Institute Publications (Middle English Texts Series), 1990, vi + 146 p. [www]
Traductions modernes
  • en anglais:
    • The Flower and the Leaf, London, Arnold; New York, Buckley, 1902, 46 p. [HT] [IA]
Études
  • Barratt, Alexandra A. T., « The Flower and the Leaf and The Assembly of Ladies: is there a (sexual) difference? », Philological Quarterly, 66, 1987, p. 1-24.
  • Battles, Paul, « In folly ripe, in reason rotten: The Flower and the Leaf and the Purgatory of Cruel Beauties », Medium Ævum, 72, 2003, p. 238-258.
  • Harrington, David V., « The function of allegory in The Flower and the Leaf », Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, 71, 1970, p. 244-253.
  • Marsh, George L., Sources and Analogues of "The Flower and the Leaf", Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1906, 1-47, 1-47 p. [GB] [IA]
    Éditions antérieures:
    • Marsh, George L., « Sources and analogues of The Flower and the Leaf. Part I », Modern Philology, 4:1, 1906-1907, p. 121-167. https://www.jstor.org/stable/432602
    • Marsh, George L., « Sources and analogues of The Flower and the Leaf. Part II », Modern Philology, 4:2, 1906-1907, p. 281-327. https://www.jstor.org/stable/432731
  • McClumpha, Charles Flint, « Origin of The Flower and the Leaf », Modern Language Notes, 4:7, 1889, p. 201-203. [GB] [IA] DOI: 10.2307/2919002
  • McMillan, Ann, « "Fayre Sisters Al": The Flower and the Leaf and The Assembly of Ladies », Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, 1, 1982, p. 27-42.
  • Pearsall, Derek, « The Flower and the Leaf and The Assembly of Ladies: a revisitation », Studies in Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Texts in Honour of John Scattergood, éd. Anne Marie D'Arcy et Alan J. Fletcher, Dublin, Four Courts Press, 2005, p. 259-269.
  • Snyder, Cynthia Lockard, « The Floure and the Leafe: an alternate approach », New Readings of Late Medieval Love Poems, éd. David Chamberlain, Lanham, University Press of America, 1993, p. 145-171.
Répertoires bibliographiques
Rédaction: Laurent Brun
Dernière mise à jour: 12 août 2014